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Creep

"Creep" is a song recorded by American group TLC for their second studio album, CrazySexyCool (1994). It was written and produced by their frequent collaborator Dallas Austin, who tried to write the track from his "female perspective," basing on group member Tionne "T-Boz" Watkins's real story of infidelity. The song's lyrics portray the singers as women that cheat back at their lovers for the attention. This context was considered to be controversial as it was strongly opposed by member Lisa "Left Eye" Lopes, who even threatened to wear black tape over her mouth on its accompanying music video.

Despite this, LaFace and Arista Records still released the song as the album's lead single on October 31, 1994, which subsequently granted critical acclaim and commercial success. Praises from music critics went to Austin's work and TLC's new musical direction while commercially, "Creep" became the group's first number one on US Billboard Hot 100. It topped the chart for four consecutive weeks and was later certificated Platinum status in sales. Following its European debut/re-issue in early 1996, the song climbed into the United Kingdom's and New Zealand's top-tens and gained many top-forty peaks in near countries. As for Lopes' part, she instead wrote a new rap verse for the single's remixes, warning listeners of safe sex matters. "Creep" received many recognition from various publications' best-of lists and awards, including their first Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals at the 38th ceremony. Also at this particular event, they have infamously announced their bankruptcy backstage.

For the music video, the trio scrapped the first two versions as disappointing results. For the third one, they eventually contacted Matthew Rolston after seeing his works for Salt-N-Pepa. This version of the music video was later deemed as one of the most iconic pop videos of all time, mainly for its famous silk pajamas costume and for the choreography. With many changes in both musical style and image, the song marked a major reinvention in TLC's career and was hailed as a "masterpiece". They had performed the song during several live concerts and television events, with the track being used in films and TV series, covered and sampled by such musicians as American rock band The Afghan Whigs and singer Zendaya.


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This page uses material from the Wikipedia articles "Creep (TLC song)" (contributors), and the Wikipedia article "TLC" (contributors), which are released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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